Sizzling summer brings water challenges to gardens

Sun, Jul 27, 2014

Climate Change

Gardeners probably have mixed views on whether the current heatwave continuing into August is good or bad for their plants.http://www.theweatheroutlook.com/twoother/latest.aspx

Endless sunshine and soaring temperatures may encourage flowers to keep blooming but keeping your garden watered and preventing the plants from wilting can prove to be an ongoing challenge.

portugal-027

Less than 3 percent of the annual water consumption of an average household is estimated to be from garden use, but at peak demand as much as 70 percent of water supplied may be used in gardens. This surge in demand can lead to water companies being forced to deplete groundwater and streams, which can cause serious environmental damage as well as raising the cost of water for consumers. Gardeners should therefore use mains water as sparingly as they can.

Even in dry districts, 24,000 litres (5280 gallons or 150 water butts) could be collected from the roof each year. However, most water falls in winter, and would have to be stored for use in summer. There are about 18 weeks from May until September when plants’ needs exceed rainfall. At first, the shortfall is met from soil reserves, but these can peter out by July, leading to about six weeks when watering is needed.

The RHS offers excellent advice on using rainwater and recycling grey water  in the Summer 2014 heatwave http://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/Profile?pid=313

555821_10152139888919838_1662887158_n

This post was written by:

- who has written 866 posts on My Climate Change Garden.

I am not an experienced gardener - more of an enthusiastic amateur who learns by trial and error and is keen to "manage" the effects of the weather on my garden. Writing this blog is my passion and I hope that it will continue to grow, allowing global gardeners to communicate about the effects of climate change on our plants and the future of our gardens.

Contact the author

Leave a Reply