Palm trees grew in the Antartic

Thu, Aug 2, 2012

Climate Change

Scientists have discovered plants similar to palm trees growing in the Antarctic region during the early Eocene era, when the area had a near-tropical climate.

They have shown the area, which is today typified by freezing temperatures, glaciers and icebergs, had almost three times the level of carbon dioxide as now, with warm weather and virtually no frost.

The research found winters were an “extremely mild” 10C, with warm summer temperatures up to 21C, and were “essentially frost-free despite polar darkness”.

The climate, totally alien to that of the Antarctic today, “supported the growth of highly diverse, near-tropical forests characterized by mesothermal to megathermal floral elements including palms and Bombacoideae.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/environment/climatechange/9445825/Palm-trees-could-grow-in-Antarctic-if-climate-change-continues-scientists-say.html

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- who has written 843 posts on My Climate Change Garden.

I am not an experienced gardener - more of an enthusiastic amateur who learns by trial and error and is keen to "manage" the effects of the weather on my garden. Writing this blog is my passion and I hope that it will continue to grow, allowing global gardeners to communicate about the effects of climate change on our plants and the future of our gardens.

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