Greening Grey Britain – new RHS gardening campaign

The RHS is the UK’s leading gardening charity and it was established to share the best in gardening. The RHS is driven by a simple love of plants and the belief that gardeners make the world a better place.

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The RHS latest campaign launched at Easter 2015 with a three-year target to transform 6,000 unloved grey spaces into thriving, planted up places.

Here are the details from the RHS website of this inspirational new opportunity for gardeners and communities to think about how they can help green Britain for a more sustainable and environmentally friendly future for everyone.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/communities/campaigns/green-streets-better-lives

What is the RHS doing?

The RHS are making a stand against the depressing concrete sprawl, calling for people to get ‘Greening Grey Britain’ by turning unloved and unspectacular parts of their neighbourhoods into something beautiful and to make their gardens even greener.

Their aim is to  share ideas ranging from pulling up a paving stone and planting it up, to creating a window box, planting up front gardens and transforming grey private gardens and community areas.

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Alistair Griffiths, RHS Director of Science and Collections, says: “Through this three-year initiative with our army of 300,000 RHS Bloom volunteers engaged, individual homeowners and RHS members, we hope to make a transformational difference across the UK. We’ll also put the spotlight on front gardens and how to have parking and incorporate plants. Paving over front gardens is a critical issue, which we know people care about: 60% of people in the UK worry about paved front gardens and flooding*.”

Who can get involved?

It doesn’t matter if you own a large garden or a window box, everyone with access to outdoor space can get involved in Greening Grey Britain. It needn’t be difficult task; start by planting on plant at a time.

If hundreds and thousands of people across the country grew more plants in gardens and community spaces, it would improve our air quality, benefit us, our wildlife and reduce temperatures and flooding risks.

Take part if you are:

• an individual

• a community group

• a school

• councils

• businesses

• anyone else willing!

unnamedHow do I take part?

 

As part of Greening Grey Britain for the RHS simply pledge to reduce grey and increase green – the plants. Here are five simple things you could do and why they help:

Five things you could do

The positive difference you could make

Plant a tree Regulate temperature, attract wildlife, reduce flooding & pollution
Plant a shrub Regulate temperature, attract wildlife, reduce flooding
Plant a climber Regulate temperature, attract wildlife, reduce energy bills
Plant a hedge Regulate temperature, attract wildlife, reduce pollution
Plant a container Reduce flooding, attract wildlife

 

All Pledges will count towards our target of transforming 6,000 grey spaces by 2017.

Get inspired by the RHS

Inspiration to get Greening Grey Britain will be promoted at the RHS Shows, including RHS Chelsea Flower Show, and through its science and advisory work. Communities and individuals will be asked to pledge what action they’ll take and there will initiatives to share before and after images of Greening Grey Britain gardening activity online.

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Additionally, here are four bite-size projects you can get started with to green up your garden

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*The RHS commissioned a survey to 2,000 adults across the UK about gardening and growing plants. The research was conducted by Censuswide, with 2,023 respondents aged 16+ in GB between 27.10.14 – 28.10.14.  The survey was conducted from a random sample of UK adults. Censuswide abide by and employ members of the Market Research Society which is based on the ESOMAR principles

This post was written by:

- who has written 863 posts on My Climate Change Garden.

I am not an experienced gardener - more of an enthusiastic amateur who learns by trial and error and is keen to "manage" the effects of the weather on my garden. Writing this blog is my passion and I hope that it will continue to grow, allowing global gardeners to communicate about the effects of climate change on our plants and the future of our gardens.

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