Coldest March for 50 years

Sun, Mar 24, 2013

Climate Change, UK Climate Change

The UK is already on course for the coldest March since 1970, in sharp contrast to last year’s record breaking heat.

Forecasters have predicted that we may have to look back as far as 1962 to find such a bitter start to spring as the mercury plummets again next week.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/topics/weather/9948450/The-competition-for-coldest-March-in-50-years.html

Spring is certainly finding it very hard to get started this year and gardeners in particular are suffering from a very late start to  the growing season as temperatures stay well below the seasonal average. British summer time should be just a few days away but no sign of warmer temperatures yet.

 

Why we are having such unseasonal weather in March?  It appears that the jet stream has moved south again producing yet another Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW)   which often results in very cold UK weather http://metofficenews.wordpress.com/tag/jet-stream/.

As always our UK weather is encouraging debate about whether this is going to be part of our normal weather cycle . It is surprising how many people continue to deny the existence of climate change and still refuse to accept that such weird weather suggests even more unpredictable climatic changes ahead that will seriously affect all of us – particularly gardens and plants.There is clear evidence  that melting sea ice at the Poles as a result of man made climate change will certainly make these events more frequent and severe.

http://www.southwestclimatechange.org/blog/16562

Love to know your views on this issue? Follow this heated debate on one of the Daily Mail special reports about UK weather:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2296185/UK-weather-March-coldest-50-years-winter-expected-stay-week.html

 

 

This post was written by:

- who has written 869 posts on My Climate Change Garden.

I am not an experienced gardener - more of an enthusiastic amateur who learns by trial and error and is keen to "manage" the effects of the weather on my garden. Writing this blog is my passion and I hope that it will continue to grow, allowing global gardeners to communicate about the effects of climate change on our plants and the future of our gardens.

Contact the author

Leave a Reply