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Japanese Wisteria

10. April 2008

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Japanese Wisteria

Latin name: Wisteria Description: A climber that always brings timeless elegance to the garden and a touch of the exotic. They are very vigorous plants once established and look beautiful when draped over pergolas walls or grown as standards. Wisterias need regular pruning for the best flower production. If space allows, this glorious plant can […]

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Windmill Palm, Fan Palm

10. April 2008

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Windmill Palm, Fan Palm

Latin name: Trachycarpus fortunei Description: Once rare in this country, but know excepted as the hardiest palm that be grown anywhere in the British Isles as it will take lows of at least -15C. This absolutely essential palm, once established, can grow 30cm of trunk a year. The typical fan-shaped leaves can grow up to […]

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Rice-Paper Plant

10. April 2008

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Rice-Paper Plant

Latin name: Tetrapanax papyrifer Description: Ludicrously architectural plant that is literally jaw-dropping! It is a vigorous suckering shrub that is evergreen in mild areas. The huge, dark green, deeply lobed leaves, up to 1 meter across, are formed on long stalks giving a very dramatic appearance. The whole plant looks somewhat like a Fatsia on […]

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Black Leaved Elder

10. April 2008

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Black Leaved Elder

Latin name: Sambucus nigra ‘Black Lace’ Description: Elder is a well known shrub in our hedge rows, but there are several highly garden worthy forms and Sambucus niger is certainly one of them. If pollarded (cut to the ground) yearly it will produce up to 2m of fresh growth. ‘Black Lace’ makes a striking plant […]

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Golden Locust Tree

10. April 2008

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Golden Locust Tree

Latin name: Robinia pseudoacacia ‘Frisia’ Description: ‘Frisia’ is much more exotic looking than the plane green form. Its luxuriant leaves are composed of nineteen individual leaflets that are golden yellow when young 9 looking beautiful against a blue sky) turning greenish-yellow through summer and a glowing orange-yellow in the autumn. The whole tree has a […]

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Pseudopanax

10. April 2008

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Pseudopanax

Latin name: Pseudopanax lessonii ‘Gold Splash’ Description: Exceedingly handsome ornamental shrub with an erect, dense, bushy habit. ‘Gold Splash’ has thick, leathery, usually five palmate mid-green leaves with a strong golden yellow central variegation, making this an excellent addition to our range of garden shrubs. ‘Purpureus’ is another  beautiful form with  glossy, leathery, toothed bronze […]

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Canary Island Palm

10. April 2008

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Canary Island Palm

Latin name: Phoenix canariensis Description: Very large palm hailing from the Canary Islands and probably one of the most well known palms in the world. Found to be much hardier than originally thought in this country. They are grown for their very architectural appearance with their graceful arching green fronds that can be up to […]

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Empress Tree, Royal Paulonia

10. April 2008

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Empress Tree, Royal Paulonia

Latin name: Paulownia tomentosa Description: If you want big leaves this is the plant to have. It is a fast growing, deciduous, spreading tree with leaves from 15-30 cm across, but, if you want really big leaves, you have to pollard the tree to the ground in spring and only let one or two shots […]

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Cotton / Scotch Thistle

10. April 2008

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Cotton / Scotch Thistle

Latin name: Onopodum acanthium Description: The statuesque proportions of this plant are a sight to behold. The stems of this native Scotch thistle are clothed in very spiny greyish silver foliage above which, large pale-purple or occasionally white, thistle-like flower-heads appear in July and August. It is best planted at the back of a border […]

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Olive Tree

10. April 2008

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Olive Tree

Latin name: Olea europa Description: Redolent of Mediterranean holidays, this is a tree that British gardeners thought would be to tender for or supposedly chilly climate, but, with climate change in mind, we should be able to collect our own olives in the decades to come. Olive trees are slow growing with narrowly oblong greyish […]

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