Food Gardening with Attitude

Cultivating your food gardening attitude

Here are some inspirational words for growing your own produce from  Australian Peter Kearney of City Food Growers

It is very easy to be consumed by all the tasks and challenges of growing food with organic methods. In fact, for many gardeners, their early excitement fades as the challenges mount. Growing food is not easy, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be learnt. But even with knowledge, what can you fall back on to sustain your enthusiasm?Let us firstly consider your reasons for having a food garden?

  1. You want food – But you can also get food at the supermarket;
  2. The food will taste better and be healthier – This is very likely so long as you get a crop and  use organic methods;
  3. You will save money – This is also likely, but if you spend too much money on garden inputs and have failed crops, it would be cheaper to hunt for a bargain at a market;
  4. You love gardening and recognise it is very important for your well being.

Each of the points above are valid reasons for having your own food garden, but the question still remains, what happens when you are too busy to be in the garden, have money in your pocket to buy food, can find a bargain and your food garden has become a haven for pests and weeds instead of that wonderful food you expected.

Developing an attitude of love for your garden fosters incredible patience and persistence, two of most important attributes of a “green thumb”.  You can become very conscious of this feeling of love by sitting in your garden rather than working and observing the plants slowly, listening to the birds and attempting to connect your thinking and feeling to all the life that surrounds the garden.

Honing your observation skills in this way leads to questions and a thirst for knowledge. Our business is all about this “how-to” gardening knowledge, so I know it is important. But I also know from working in my own garden for many years that my attitude of love for the garden and realising the healing benefits to my own well being are the real driving forces behind my successful garden.

As with all things in life where you strive for enjoyment, value and results, being conscious of your way of being when you work has a fundamental impact on the outcome.

Happy contemplation in your garden and make sure you resist the temptation to pull weeds while you are observing, save that work till later!

Peter Kearney: http://cityfoodgrowers.com.au/blog-latestposts.php?catid=110

This post was written by:

- who has written 866 posts on My Climate Change Garden.

I am not an experienced gardener - more of an enthusiastic amateur who learns by trial and error and is keen to "manage" the effects of the weather on my garden. Writing this blog is my passion and I hope that it will continue to grow, allowing global gardeners to communicate about the effects of climate change on our plants and the future of our gardens.

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